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By: Jeff Byers

To allow or not to allow personal smartphones and other mobile computing devices into the healthcare setting? That's one thought becoming less of a question and more a reality check as bring-your-own-device (BYOD) initiatives become imperative for CMIOs and IT departments. It's no longer an option, Jason W. Zeller, director of information security and risk management at Kaiser Permanente, said during an April virtual event hosted by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS). Zeller noted that healthcare market adoption of smartphones is projected to be 68 percent by 2015, up from 12 percent in 2008.

Smartphones aren't the only devices getting in the healthcare game. Manhattan Research purported that physician tablet adoption for professional purposes...

Editorial
By: Donald L. Levick
Tablets and smartphones continue to infiltrate our personal and professional lives. As a shiny new toy, a smartphone or tablet fulfills important criteria: easy access, affordability, user...
Features
By: Justine Varieur Cadet
Off-label prescribing, the use of drugs for indications that have not received regulatory approval, occurs with up to 21 percent of prescribed drugs. Innovative health IT experts are employing...
Editorial
By: Beth Walsh
While it may seem that all the different responsibilities on your plate will converge only in some future alternate reality, there just may be underlying parallels already in play.
Features
By: Beth Walsh
With more and more patient data to collect, more providers are finding better ways to put those data to use to improve patient outcomes and lower costs. A Wisconsin clinic has built a clinical...
Features
By: Beth Walsh
Patient-centered medical homes have moved past the pilot phase and into mainstream medicine for many providers. Whether focused on a specific patient population or medical condition, this new model...